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Pub Date Title & Description Subcategory
thumbnail image of the resource cover 2017-02-24February 2017 State of the American Workplace 2017
Many factors influence engagement and active disengagement in the workplace. Company size, employment status and economic conditions can all play a part in how employees feel about their jobs and organizations, as can occupation, tenure and education level. However, Gallup finds that managers account for at least 70% of the variance in employee engagement scores across business units. Organizations must ensure they are hiring and promoting the right people into management roles and giving these individuals the training, support and direction they need to succeed. Leaders have to address managers engagement needs in the same way they expect managers to address the engagement needs of their employees. Gallup's State of the Workplace initiative aims to change workplaces for economic and human development by providing leaders and organizations with analytics, advice and science-based solutions that reflect the attitudes and behaviors of employees and their workplaces in more than 140 countries.
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Author: Gallup
thumbnail image of the resource cover 2017-02-03February 3 2017 How Banks Can Support Workforce Development
Given the increasingly burdensome funding gaps, it is imperative that workforce practitioners exchange resources and expertise with stakeholders from financial services and other industries to strengthen local communities. This article examines two legislative acts intended to help low- and moderate-income (LMI) communities and explores three engagement strategies that workforce entities and financial institutions can adopt in partnership for mutual and community benefit.
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Author: Federal Reserve Bank of NY
thumbnail image of the resource cover 2016-10-06October 2016 The State of American Jobs
How the shifting economic landscape is reshaping work and society and affecting the way people think about the skills and training they need to get ahead: Tectonic changes are reshaping U.S. workplaces as the economy moves deeper into the knowledge-focused age. These changes are affecting the very nature of jobs by rewarding social, communications and analytical skills. They are prodding many workers to think about lifetime commitments to retraining and upgrading their skills. And they may be prompting a society-wide reckoning about where those constantly evolving skills should be learned—and what the role of colleges should be. A Pew Research Center survey, conducted in association with the Markle Foundation, finds that these new realities are not lost on the American public: The vast majority of U.S. workers say that new skills and training may hold the key to their future job success.
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Author: Pew Research Center
thumbnail image of the resource cover 2016-08-16August 2016 Portland Development Commission: TechTown Diversity Pledge
The participating companies in the TechTown Diversity Pledge initiative have released their first report on employee demographic data, delivering on one of the key goals of the Pledge: to share collective data on the demographic representation of gender and race within participant company offices in the Portland metro area. DHM Research conducted an online survey with employees of companies that are a part of the TechTown Diversity Pledge initiative. This survey was supported by the Portland Development Commission. The purpose of the survey was to meet the fifth goal of the pledge: “Share our collective data on the demographic representation within our offices in the Portland metro area of gender and race.” Employees were presented with a wide-ranging series of demographic questions, as well as two questions about their workplace environment. Findings from this survey will serve as a benchmark to track changes over time.
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Author: DHM Research
thumbnail image of the resource cover 2016-07-01July 2016 Where machines could replace humans—and where they can’t (yet)
As automation technologies such as machine learning and robotics play an increasingly great role in everyday life, their potential effect on the workplace has, unsurprisingly, become a major focus of research and public concern. The discussion tends toward a Manichean guessing game: which jobs will or won’t be replaced by machines? In fact, as our research has begun to show, the story is more nuanced. While automation will eliminate very few occupations entirely in the next decade, it will affect portions of almost all jobs to a greater or lesser degree, depending on the type of work they entail. Automation, now going beyond routine manufacturing activities, has the potential, as least with regard to its technical feasibility, to transform sectors such as healthcare and finance, which involve a substantial share of knowledge work.
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Author: McKinsey & Company
thumbnail image of the resource cover 2014-10-01October 2014 2014 Oregon Workers' Compensation Premium Rate Ranking Summary
Oregon employers in the voluntary market pay, on average, the 43rd highest workers’ compensation premium rates in the nation. Oregon’s rates are 26 percent below those of the median state in the DCBS study.
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Author: Oregon Department of Consumer & Business Services
thumbnail image of the resource cover 2011-01-01January 2011 Workforce Skills and Innovation: An Overview of Major Themes in the Literature
This paper provides an account of the main approaches, debates and evidence in the literature on the role of workforce skills in the innovation process in developed economies. It draws on multiple sources including the innovation studies discipline, neoclassical Human Capital theory, institutionalist labour market studies and the work organisation discipline. Extensive use is also made of official survey data to describe and quantify the diversity of skills and occupations involved in specific types of innovation activities.
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Author: OECD Directorate for Science, Technology and Industry (STI), Centre for Educational Research and Innovation (CERI)
thumbnail image of the resource cover 2016-05-01May 2016 America’s Shrinking Middle Class: A Close Look at Changes Within Metropolitan Areas
The American middle class is losing ground in metropolitan areas across the country, affecting communities from Boston to Seattle and from Dallas to Milwaukee. From 2000 to 2014 the share of adults living in middle-income households fell in 203 of the 229 U.S. metropolitan areas examined in a new Pew Research Center analysis of government data.
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Author: Pew Research Center
Employment
thumbnail image of the resource cover 2016-02-01February 2016 Oregon's Minimum Wage Jobs: Facts, Figures and Context
Oregon’s minimum wage was one of the highest in the nation since the passage of Measure 25 in 2002. The initiative raised the state’s minimum wage from $6.50 to $6.90 per hour in 2003 and created a new provision for Oregon’s minimum wage to increase each year based on the rate of inflation. After a decade of relatively few discussions about Oregon’s minimum wage, proposals calling for increasing Oregon’s minimum wage from $9.25 per hour to $13.50 or $15.00 are receiving a lot of attention. The goal of this report is to compile the available foundational data and interpretation that can inform discussions about Oregon’s minimum wage. The data helps answer many of the questions we receive about the minimum wage. Much of the information included in this report has already been presented in various legislative and other forums. This report, for the first time, brings the data into a single, complete compendium.
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Author: Oregon Employment Department
Employment
thumbnail image of the resource cover 2015-12-01December 2015 The American Middle Class Is Losing Ground: No longer the majority and falling behind financially
After more than four decades of serving as the nation's economic majority, the American middle class is now matched in number by those in the economic tiers above and below it. In early 2015, 120.8 million adults were in middle-income households, compared with 121.3 million in lower- and upper-income households combined, a demographic shift that could signal a tipping point, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of government data.
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Author: Pew Research Center
Employment