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Oregon's tax system is ranked the 11th most business friendly in the U.S. by the Tax Foundation. Not having a sales tax helps. These resources can help you stay up-to-date on how Oregon's economy is performing compared to other states.

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Pub Date Title & Description Subcategory
thumbnail image of the resource cover 2016-10-01October 2016 Meeting the Demographic Challenge in Cities
The days of easy growth in the world’s cities are over, and how they respond to demographic shifts will influence their prosperity. Cities have powered the world economy for centuries. Large cities generate about 75 percent of global GDP today and will generate 86 percent of worldwide GDP growth between 2015 and 2030. Population growth has been the crucial driver of cities’ GDP growth, accounting for 58 percent of it among large cities between 2000 and 2012. Rising per capita income contributed the other 42 percent. However, the world’s cities are facing more challenging demographics, and the days of easy growth are over. In the past, city economies expanded largely because their populations were increasing due to high birthrates and mass migration from rural areas. Both of those sources of population growth are now diminishing. Global population growth is slowing because of declining fertility rates and aging. At the same time, rural-to-urban migration is running its course and plateauing in many regions. How cities adjust to the new reality is important not only for their prospects but also for those of nations that will continue to rely on thriving cities for rising prosperity.
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Author: McKinsey Global Institute
thumbnail image of the resource cover 2016-08-03August 2016 Business Facilities’ 12th Annual Rankings Report: State Rankings
Business Facilities' 12th Annual Rankings report is our most comprehensive analysis to date of the states, metros and global locations that are leading the pack in the most important benchmarks for sustainable growth in the 21st century.
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Author: Business Facilities Magazine
thumbnail image of the resource cover 2016-08-03August 2016 Business Facilities’ 12th Annual Rankings Report: Metro Rankings
Business Facilities Magazine's 12th Annual Rankings report is our most comprehensive analysis to date of the states, metros and global locations that are leading the pack in the most important benchmarks for sustainable growth in the 21st century.
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Author: Business Facilities Magazine
thumbnail image of the resource cover 2017-03-01March 2017 Best States Rankings
Some states shine in health care. Some soar in education. Some excel in both—or in much more. The Best States ranking of U.S. states draws on thousands of data points to measure how well states are performing for their citizens. In addition to health care and education, the metrics take into account a state’s economy, the opportunity it offers people, its roads, bridges, internet and other infrastructure, its public safety and the integrity and health of state government.

More weight was accorded to some state measures than others, based on a survey of what matters most to people. Health care and education were weighted most heavily. Then came the opportunity states offer their citizens, their crime & corrections and infrastructure. State economies followed closely in weighting, followed by measures of government administration. This explains why Massachusetts, ranking No. 1 in education and No. 2 in health care, occupies the overall No. 1 spot in the Best States rankings. And it explains why New Hampshire, ranking No. 1 in opportunity for its citizens, ranks No. 2 overall in the Best States rankings.

NOTE: The links in this PDF will take you to the specific rankings.
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Author: US News & World Report and McKinsey Group
Economy
thumbnail image of the resource cover 2017-02-24February 2017 Global Economies and Consumers in 2017
The evolving economic and consumer landscape in 2017 Political instability is a key challenge going into 2017, and surprisingly, two of the biggest risks are in advanced economies. First is the Trump effect; it is hard to ascertain the exact impact a Trump presidency will have on the US and global economies, as much remains unknown about how many of his campaign promises were rhetoric and, of those that do go with him to the White House, how many he could successfully enact. The ramifications of protectionist trade policies and an expansionary fiscal stance are global, with emerging market currencies already suffering from a “Trump tantrum” in late 2016. Brexit is another unknown quantity; outside of Europe, its impact on the global economy is more subdued than a Trump downturn, but it adds another element of unpredictability at a time when political volatility is a key concern. Consumers enter 2017 to this backdrop of uncertainty. Over the course of the year, Euromonitor International is expecting consumer expenditure to rise by 2.3% in real terms, with every household saving US$3,609 on average. With the US still accounting for almost one in three dollars spent globally, consumer behaviour in the Trump era matters to the world. Despite a slowing economy, Chinese consumers will continue to see one of the largest increases in spending, and expenditure in emerging and developing economies overall will grow by more than twice that of developed markets.
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Author: EuroMonitor International
Economy
thumbnail image of the resource cover 2017-01-15January 15 2017 2017: SMB Insight Study - Growth Industries and Locations
The Business Journals’ latest SMB Insight study was fielded the day after the Presidential election (Nov. 2016). According to preliminary results (400 completed interviews), small and mid-sized business owners are continuing to feel confident in the future success of their companies. It is one of the highest levels seen to date.
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Author: The Business Journals
Economy
thumbnail image of the resource cover 2016-12-31December 31 2016 2016 Best-Performing Cities: Where America’s jobs are Created and Sustained
What drives the economic momentum of the United States' most dynamic metros? The Milken Institute's annual Best-Performing Cities report identifies the latest trends and most relevant factors powering regional growth. Our index uses comprehensive, fact-based criteria to rank the nation's metropolitan areas. This year's findings reveal how technology and accelerating housing and consumer markets played significant roles in regional economies around the nation.
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Author: Milken Institute
Economy
thumbnail image of the resource cover 2016-09-29September 29 2016 Redefining Global Cities—The Seven Types of Global Metro Economies
The world's largest metropolitan areas concentrate the drivers of global prosperity, but there isn't one way to be a global city—this report defines seven types of global cities, providing a valuable lens through which to understand an evolving global economy. No longer is the global economy driven by a select few major financial centers like New York, London, and Tokyo. Today, members of a vast and complex network of cities participate in international flows of goods, services, people, capital, and ideas, and thus make distinctive contributions to global growth and opportunity. In view of these trends and challenges, this report redefines global cities. It introduces a new typology that builds from a first-of-its-kind database of dozens of indicators, standardized across the world's 123 largest metro economies, to examine what really defines a global city—its economic characteristics, industrial structure, and key competitiveness factors.
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Author: Brookings
Economy
thumbnail image of the resource cover 2016-09-01September 2016 The 2016 State Energy Efficiency Scorecard
This tenth edition of the State Energy Efficiency Scorecard measures the progress of state policies and programs that save energy while also benefiting the environment and promoting growth. They use data vetted by state energy officials to rank states in six categories—utility programs, transportation, building energy codes, combined heat and power, state initiatives, and appliance standards. California and Massachusetts tied for first place in this year’s Scorecard. Rounding out the top five were Vermont, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and New York. The most-improved states were Missouri, Maine, and Michigan. The Scorecard shows that energy efficiency is a key resource in these states and others, with utilities spending approximately $7.7 billion in 2015 for efficiency programs nationwide, up from approximately $7.3 billion in 2014.
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Author: American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economny
Economy
thumbnail image of the resource cover 2016-08-05August 2016 Global Location Trends 2016—2016 Annual Report
The world economy continues its transformation as companies’ global operating footprints evolve based on new opportunities, challenges and technology. With growing political uncertainty, as well as new risks and disruption ushered in by evolving technologies, companies have to navigate an increasingly complex international operating environment. This tenth edition of IBM’s Global Location Trends report outlines the latest trends in corporate location selection and how today’s global dynamics influence where companies locate, expand their businesses and create jobs around the world.
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Author: IBM Global
Economy
thumbnail image of the resource cover 2016-08-01August 2016 The Talent Attraction Scorecard: Ranking Large and Small Counties On How Well They Attract and Develop Skilled Labor
Which regions are doing the best job attracting and developing talent? That’s the question they set out to answer with the Talent Attraction Scorecard. Their index uses five metrics to rank how every county has done drawing new residents, growing their skilled and overall workforces, and grabbing a greater share of skilled workers than other regions. As a complement to this analysis, they separately ranked counties based on how they are attracting young talent by looking at the growth in college enrollment and millennial population per capita. Lastly, they used cost-of-living-adjusted earnings to help explain why talent is (or is not) moving to these counties.
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Author: EMSI - Economicmodeling.com
Economy
thumbnail image of the resource cover 2016-06-21June 2016 The Fiscal Survey of States—Spring 2016
With data gathered from all 50 state budget offices, this semi-annual report provides a narrative analysis of the fiscal condition of the states and data summaries of state general fund revenues, expenditures, and balances. The spring edition details governors’ proposed budgets; the fall edition details enacted budgets.
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Author: National Association of State Budget Officers
Economy
thumbnail image of the resource cover 2016-05-01May 2016 The New Map of Economic Growth and Recovery
The New Map of Economic Growth and Recovery surveys the economic landscape emerging from the Great Recession and compares it to previous recovery periods. This analysis points to very different futures for American communities, suggesting that the gains from growth have and will continue to consolidate in the largest and most dynamic counties and leave other areas searching for their place in the new economy.
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Author: Economic Innovation Group
Economy
thumbnail image of the resource cover 2016-03-28March 2016 Reshoring Initiative Data Report: Reshoring and FDI Boost U.S. Manufacturing in 2015
This report contains data on trends in U.S. reshoring and FDI (Foreign Direst Investment) by companies that have returned or added new U.S. production from offshore. The first section of the report, Group A, contains data cumulative thru 2015. The second section, Group B, shows data for 2015 only. See chart sources to confirm the specific years represented. All data is for the U.S. only, unless otherwise noted. The combined reshoring and related FDI trends continued strong in 2015, adding 68,000 jobs and bringing the total number of manufacturing jobs brought from offshore to more than 249,000 since the manufacturing employment low of 2010. The trend was off 6% in 2015 due to: the strong dollar; low oil prices and shipping rates; and most competitor countries having weaker economies than the U.S.
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Author: The Reshoring Initiative
Economy
thumbnail image of the resource cover 2016-02-01February 2016 Remaking Economic Development: The Markets and Civics of Continuous Growth and Prosperity
The lackluster U.S. economy is delivering a humbling lesson about economic development: Top-line growth doesn't ensure bottom-line prosperity. The potential of economic development is to do what markets alone cannot do: influence growth through action and investments.
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Author: The Brookings Institution, Metropolitan Policy Program
Economy
thumbnail image of the resource cover 2016-02-01February 2016 Economic Report of the President
Annual report of the President on the state of U.S. economic conditions from the President's Council of Economic Advisers
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Author: Council of Economic Advisers
Economy
thumbnail image of the resource cover 2015-12-05December 5, 2016 Where Do We Go from Here—Oregon Business Plan Policy Playbook 2017
Oregon's economy is thriving right now, outperforming the nation in job growth, one of our key goals. There are good reasons for optimism about Oregon’s future. Firms are growing and seeking talent. We’ve made gains on raising incomes and reducing poverty. Investments in education, health care, and the social safety net have played a key role in these gains and, clearly, we want to build on this momentum. However, we face a fundamental challenge to our state’s fiscal well-being. As explained in this playbook, we anticipate a structural state budget deficit for at least a decade, even under a moderately good economic outlook. Unless we find a remedy, severe strain on state budgets will impede our ability to provide key services—education, health care, transportation and more—that are vital for a healthy economy and quality of life.
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Author: Oregon Business Plan
Economy
thumbnail image of the resource cover 2015-12-01December 2015 2015 Top-Performing Cities: Where America's jobs are created and sustained
Milken Institute's Best-Performing Cities report identifies the latest trends and most relevant factors powering regional growth. Our index uses a comprehensive, fact-based set of criteria to rank the nation's metropolitan areas. Among them are job creation, wage gains, and technology trends that shape current and potential patterns of growth.
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Author: Milken Institute
Economy
thumbnail image of the resource cover 2015-12-01December 2015 A.T. Kearney 2015 U.S. Reshoring Index
The fourth annual AT Kearney U.S. Reshoring Index 2015 shows that the much touted reshoring trend in US manufacturing is in full blown retreat. It has failed to keep up with manufactured products from offshore sources and in fact experienced its biggest drop in the last 10 years.
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Author: A.T. Kearney
Economy
thumbnail image of the resource cover 2016-06-20June 2016 Why Have Local Economic Development Efforts Been So Disappointing?
This study briefly examines the changes to overall economic development policy, with an extended focus on the supply of firms that can be attracted to a region. Key Findings
• Economic development has existed in much its current form since the Great Depression, but has now matured into a suite of specific fiscal and development efforts in US counties and municipalities.
• Research on the effectiveness of there economic development effort is mixed, with the few findings of impact (including two from this author) reporting high costs among some development incentives.
• Over the past half century, the target of most economic development efforts (footloose firms) has shrunk considerably. The United States has created almost 90 million net new jobs since 1970, but there are now fewer footloose jobs in the United States than in the 1960s, and that number continues to drop.
• It is likely that less than 1.0 percent of all jobs are potentially ‘attractable’ to a region, and fewer than 100 factories of 500+ workers opens in the U.S. in any given year. At that rate, random distribution of factories will happen in each county every 35 years.
• Not only can fewer jobs now be attracted to a region, those few that can be attracted focus most heavily on workforce quality. So, traditional business attraction has largely failed to deliver prospects.
• Almost all successful future economic development will have to focus on attracting people, not businesses.
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Author: Center for Business & Economic Research
Incentives
thumbnail image of the resource cover 2016-04-01April 2016 Following the Money 2016 How the 50 States Rate in Providing Online Access to Government Spending Data
State governments spend hundreds of billions of dollars each year through contracts for goods and services, subsidies to encourage economic development, and other expenditures. Public accountability helps ensure that state funds are spent as wisely as possible. State-operated spending transparency websites provide checkbook-level detail on government spending, allowing citizens and watchdog groups to view payments made to individual companies, the goods or services purchased, and the benefits obtained in exchange for public subsidies.
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Author: OSPIRG/Frontier Group
Incentives
thumbnail image of the resource cover 2016-02-01February 2016 State Financing Incentives for Economic Development
State governments often use their tax system to partner with the private sector on economic development initiatives. A key part of their economic development strategy, states use tax incentives as one tool of economic development to compete with other states and globally for investment, jobs, and income. This brief is part of a State and Local Finance Initiative project on state economic development strategies.
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Author: Urban Institute
Incentives
thumbnail image of the resource cover 2015-12-01December 2015 Reducing Budget Risks: Using data and design to make state tax incentives more predictable
To understand both the sources of the difficulties and potential solutions, Pew reviewed numerous state documents and news articles and conducted phone interviews with more than 40 government officials and experts from 20 states. Based on this research, this report recommends two strategies for states to employ so that they can use incentives while avoiding budgetary surprises. Strategy 1: Gather and share high-quality data on the costs of tax incentives. Strategy 2: Design incentives in ways that reduce fiscal risk.
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Author: Pew Trust
Incentives
thumbnail image of the resource cover 2015-11-01November 2015 State of State Business Incentives 2015
Annual update of C2ER State Business Incentives Database
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Author: Council For Community & Economic Research
Incentives
thumbnail image of the resource cover 2017-02-01February 2017 State Corporate Income Tax Rates and Brackets for 2017
44 states levy a corporate income tax. Rates range from 3% in North Carolina to 12% in Iowa.
  • 6 states—Alaska, Connecticut, Iowa, Minnesota, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, and the District of Columbia—levy top marginal corporate income tax rates of 9% or higher.
  • 7 states—Arizona, North Carolina, North Dakota, Colorado, Mississippi, South Carolina, and Utah—have top rates at or below 5%.
  • Nevada, Ohio, Texas, and Washington impose gross receipts taxes instead of corporate income taxes. Gross receipts taxes are generally thought to be more economically harmful than corporate income taxes.
  • South Dakota and Wyoming are the only states that do not levy a corporate income or gross receipts tax.
  • Corporate income taxes are levied in 44 states. Though often thought of as a major tax type, corporate income taxes account for just 5.4% of state tax collections and 2.7% of state general revenue. ">
    • 44 states levy a corporate income tax. Rates range from 3% in North Carolina to 12% in Iowa.
    • 6 states—Alaska, Connecticut, Iowa, Minnesota, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, and the District of Columbia—levy top marginal corporate income tax rates of 9% or higher.
    • 7 states—Arizona, North Carolina, North Dakota, Colorado, Mississippi, South Carolina, and Utah—have top rates at or below 5%.
    • Nevada, Ohio, Texas, and Washington impose gross receipts taxes instead of corporate income taxes. Gross receipts taxes are generally thought to be more economically harmful than corporate income taxes.
    • South Dakota and Wyoming are the only states that do not levy a corporate income or gross receipts tax.
    Corporate income taxes are levied in 44 states. Though often thought of as a major tax type, corporate income taxes account for just 5.4% of state tax collections and 2.7% of state general revenue.
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    Author: The Tax Foundation
    Taxes
    thumbnail image of the resource cover 2016-05-01May 2016 Using the Tax Structure for State Economic Development
    Every state uses a different combination of taxes to fund government services. Reports that rank states by how “business friendly” they are often use tax composition as the primary—and sometimes only—criteria, implicitly suggesting there is a single best tax structure to attract businesses and strengthen economies. But the effect of state taxes on business decisions is far more complex than just the composition of taxes. The effect of a state’s tax structure on economic development includes not just the mix of taxes but specific features of those taxes as well. It also depends on the overall tax burden from the combination of different taxes levied. Moreover, a state’s reliance on a particular tax can benefit certain businesses more than others. For example, property taxes are more burdensome to a capital-intensive company than a labor-intensive company. This disparate effect within the state, not the overall ranking, is what creates incentives for states to modify their tax structure for economic development purposes.
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    Author: Urban Institute
    Taxes
    thumbnail image of the resource cover 2016-03-01March 2016 Assessing Fiscal Capacities of States: A Representative Revenue System
    States vary in how much governments collect in revenue and spend on goods and services. To understand the sources of these differences, the report's authors examined what states could raise (revenue capacity) and would spend (expenditure need) if they followed national averages, taking into account their own demographics and economic conditions in FY 2012. They found wide variation in both measures and the differences between them—that is, fiscal gaps at capacity. Federal funds closed these gaps in some states, but not all, raising questions about how to design effective federal grant programs as well as state and local tax and spending policies.
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    Author: Urban Institute
    Taxes
    thumbnail image of the resource cover 2016-02-01February 2016 Small Business Policy Index: Ranking the States on Policy Measures and Costs Impacting Entrepreneurship and Small Business Growth
    The “Small Business Policy Index: Ranking the States on Policy Measures and Costs Impacting Entrepreneurship and Small Business Growth” examines the 50 states according to various major government-imposed or government-related costs that directly or indirectly affect entrepreneurship and business, as well as the investment that is so critical to start-ups and firms looking to grow. To sum up, the Index ranks the states according to their public policy climates for the risk taking that drives economic growth and job creation.
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    Author: Small Business & Entrepreneurship Council
    Taxes
    thumbnail image of the resource cover 2016-02-01February 2016 How to Use Carbon Tax Revenues
    How should governments use the considerable revenue carbon taxes can raise? There are many options for cutting other taxes, increasing spending, or reducing borrowing. We organize the options into four goals: offset the new burdens that a carbon tax places on consumers, producers, communities, and the broader economy; support further efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions; ameliorate the harms of climate disruption; and fund unrelated public priorities. We identify important tradeoffs across the goals and make several recommendations for policy design. Revenue neutrality, for example, can assuage public concerns about expanding government, but spending may be better than tax reductions for achieving some goals. We recommend that governments use some revenue to reduce other taxes and to soften the blow to lower-income households, coal workers, and their communities, that they be cautious about using revenues to pursue emissions reductions the tax itself encourages, and that they avoid tight earmarks. Governments should also pay special attention to using revenue in ways that attract and sustain stakeholder and public support for a carbon tax.
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    Author: Tax Policy Center - Brookings and the Urban Institute
    Taxes
    thumbnail image of the resource cover 2015-12-01December 2015 The Relationship Between Taxes and Growth at the State Level: New Evidence
    The effects of state tax policy on economic growth, entrepreneurship, and employment remain controversial. Using a framework that in prior research generated significant, negative, and robust effects of taxes on growth, the authors found that neither tax revenues nor top income tax rates bear stable relations to economic growth or employment across states and over time. While the rate of firm formation is negatively affected by top income tax rates, the effects are small in economic terms. The results are inconsistent with the view that cuts in top state income tax rates will automatically or necessarily generate growth.
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    Author: National Tax Journal
    Taxes
    thumbnail image of the resource cover 2015-10-01October 2015 Total State and Local Business Taxes: State-by-State Estimates FY 2014
    Detailed state-by-state estimates of the state and local taxes paid by businesses for FY2014.
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    Author: Council on State Taxation/Ernst & Young
    Taxes
    thumbnail image of the resource cover 2015-07-01July 2015 Location Matters: The State Tax Costs of Doing Business
    Apples-to-apples comparison of corporate tax costs in the 50 states
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    Author: KPMG/Tax Foundation
    Taxes